Empty Stable Column on translate.wordpress.org

I was recently making some changes to my Toggle wpautop plugin in the wordpress.org plugin repository when I encountered a strange issue related to translate.wordpress.org that I wanted to share.

First, in case you are not familiar, here is a little bit of background on how translations work for WordPress.

Way back in 2013, WordPress 3.7 added support for something called language packs. When combined with Glotpress and a few automated processes behind the scenes, anyone who is multilingual with a WordPress.org account can translate plugins, themes, and even WordPress core through a simple front end interface.

This interface exists at translate.wordpress.org. As an example, here is what the translation page looks like for Akismet.

Akismet’s WordPress.org Translation page

Once a specific locale reaches the 95% translation mark, a language pack will be generated and automatically made available to anyone using the plugin on their WordPress site with that language locale selected.

Anytime you push an update to your plugin’s SVN repository, identical strings from past versions are automatically synced to the most recent versions. You can even watch this happen in the #meta-language-packs channel of the Making WordPress Slack.

Now, on to the issue that I experienced. When I pushed my updates to the plugin’s SVN repository, I noticed that the “Stable” column was empty. This was weird because “Development” and “Stable” were the same code.

Empty “Stable” column for Toggle wpautop translations.

I posted my question in related channels within the Make WordPress Slack, and Sergey Biryukov was able to give me an answer.

I had committed my new code and changed the plugin’s stable version in the plugin file’s header in the same commit. Because of this, the automated processes that generate the translations behind the scenes could not generate a list for “Stable”.

To fix this, just make a commit to the plugin’s repository. I did this by increasing the version number while leaving the stable version alone. I watched the #meta-language-packs channel for my plugin to be regenerated after doing this, and all was well.

Do you speak another language? Hop over to the Toggle wpautop translation page and spend a few minutes translating my plugin. All contributions are appreciated.

For more background info on how translations work on wordpress.org, check out these Make WordPress blog posts.

If you are a plugin or theme developer and want to learn more about using language packs in your code, read through the core handbook for Internationalizing Your Plugins, and Internationalizing Your Themes.

I hope that someone finds this helpful!

Removing large files when using git-svn to migrate repositories

Today I was migrating SVN repositories over to GIT using BU’s svn2git utility. I came across one repository that GitHub would not allow me to push because it contained a file that was over 100MB.

After some investigation, I realized that the file it specified was only 25KB. However, at some point in its history it was over 100MB, Because I was pushing the entire commit history for that repository, it was rejecting everything.

The solution is to remove the file entirely from the repository’s history. It took some trial and error for me to find something that worked for me because most snippets relied on history already existing in the origin repository. Here is what worked for me:

git filter-branch --index-filter "git rm -rf --cached --ignore-unmatch path_to_file" HEAD

Hope this helps someone!

WordCamp Rhode Island 2016 Slides

At WordCamp Rhode Island 2016, I ran the Contributor Day workshop. Before we got to work contributing to core, I gave a short presentation about how the WordPress development process works, and introduced them to the tools they would need to be familiar with.

Download my slides here.

I followed the Trac tickets that the participants became involved in. By my count, 5 first time contributors were credited in WordPress 4.7.

Congrats to all of the first-time contributors from WordCamp Rhode Island!

Boston WordPress Meetup Talk

This past Monday, I had the opportunity to speak at the monthly WordPress Boston meetup. If you are not familiar, WordPress meetups happen regularly all across the globe. There are several in the New England area alone.

My talk was titled Coding Standards & Best Practices !important;. I talked about what coding standards are, where you can learn more about them, and why everyone should be using them.

Ski Weekend 2016

This weekend, me and several friends went on a mini getaway to North Conway, New Hampshire. We found a great place on airbnb that was able to accommodate all of us.

When we walked in, we were greeted on the counter by a bottle of wine, and a guest book. The guest book was filled with stories from past guests answering the following questions:

  • How was the weather?
  • What were your favorite adventures?
  • Did you get discover any great restaurants?
  • Anything else you would like to share about your stay?

We spent time reading the stories in the book, which contained everything from bears climbing through the kitchen window in August to going skiing for the first time ever at Cranmore. But as we read these recollections, it was missing one thing: faces.

And that’s where this post comes in! We wrote our stories in the book for future guests to enjoy and included a link to this post in order to share photos of our trip with these future guests.

If you are reading this and are also a guest of the Tonnings, comment below and tell us about your trip.

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Skiing at Cranmore

Tubing at Cranmore

Diana’s Bath