Removing large files when using git-svn to migrate repositories

Today I was migrating SVN repositories over to GIT using BU’s svn2git utility. I came across one repository that GitHub would not allow me to push because it contained a file that was over 100MB.

After some investigation, I realized that the file it specified was only 25KB. However, at some point in its history it was over 100MB, Because I was pushing the entire commit history for that repository, it was rejecting everything.

The solution is to remove the file entirely from the repository’s history. It took some trial and error for me to find something that worked for me because most snippets relied on history already existing in the origin repository. Here is what worked for me:

git filter-branch --index-filter "git rm -rf --cached --ignore-unmatch path_to_file" HEAD

Hope this helps someone!

Ski Weekend 2016

This weekend, me and several friends went on a mini getaway to North Conway, New Hampshire. We found a great place on airbnb that was able to accommodate all of us.

When we walked in, we were greeted on the counter by a bottle of wine, and a guest book. The guest book was filled with stories from past guests answering the following questions:

  • How was the weather?
  • What were your favorite adventures?
  • Did you get discover any great restaurants?
  • Anything else you would like to share about your stay?

We spent time reading the stories in the book, which contained everything from bears climbing through the kitchen window in August to going skiing for the first time ever at Cranmore. But as we read these recollections, it was missing one thing: faces.

And that’s where this post comes in! We wrote our stories in the book for future guests to enjoy and included a link to this post in order to share photos of our trip with these future guests.

If you are reading this and are also a guest of the Tonnings, comment below and tell us about your trip.

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Skiing at Cranmore

Tubing at Cranmore

Diana’s Bath

 

WordCamp Providence 2012 Session Video

In case you missed it, I was able to speak at WordCamp Providence last fall. My session was entitled Plugin Development – Stirred not Shaken.

This presentation makes sense of the pandemonium of plugin development by breaking it down into three stages: planning, implementation, and release, while providing resources and discussing best practices.

If you missed it, now is your chance to get a look. Video of my presentation is now up on WordPress.tv

There are also a bunch of other WordCamp Providence 2012 session videos available.